Monthly Archives: August 2013

My Journey to Hell and Back, A Personal Experience with CBT and ERP

Standard

Jackie had the courage to do something I never went through myself—intense therapy for her OCD symptoms. By the time I found an OCD specialist I had already been taking medication for a while and felt better. The therapist I spoke to said exposure and response prevention (ERP) could actually make me feel worse, so I stuck to the path I was already on.

Read about her experience with ERP—her story is so inspiring!

IOCDF Blog

Jackie Lea SommersI am pleased to introduce you to our newest guest blogger, Jackie Lea Sommers.  You may remember Jackie from OCD Awareness Week in 2012, when she won our creative expression award for her short story, Tipping Point.  In today’s blog, Jackie writes about her personal experience of conquering her demons through cognitive behavioral therapy. Jackie lives in Minneapolis and also blogs about OCD and creativity her own website at www.jackieleasommers.com. – CB

My Journey to Hell and Back, A Personal Experience with CBT and ERP

by Jackie Lea Sommers

You’d be shocked to hear just how similar my Minnesota hometown was to Mayberry, that sweet fictional town of Andy Griffith Show fame.  We didn’t lock our homes or cars, everyone knew everyone else, and the whole town showed up each Friday night for high school football.  My parents were and are the funniest, most generous people I know…

View original post 1,051 more words

Listening to My Gut

Standard

Today’s blog is the latest installment from our guest blogger, Alison Dotson, author of the upcoming book, Being Me with OCD. When I read Alison’s blog below, what struck me was the importance of recognizing how self-care and flexibility are critical components of relapse prevention. Medication, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or a combination of both, are all first-line treatments for OCD. However, we can sometimes forget that OCD happens inside a person. It isn’t enough to just treat our psychological and physiological symptoms — we also need to take good care of ourselves, be thoughtful of our choices, and not lose our voice in order to try to live a full, sustainable life.   – IOCDF executive director, Jeff Szymanski, PhD

IOCDF Blog

Today’s blog is the latest installment from our guest blogger, Alison Dotson, author of the upcoming book, Being Me with OCD. When I read Alison’s blog below, what struck me was the importance of recognizing how self-care and flexibility are critical components of relapse prevention. Medication, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or a combination of both, are all first-line treatments for OCD. However, we can sometimes forget that OCD happens inside a person. It isn’t enough to just treat our psychological and physiological symptoms — we also need to take good care of ourselves, be thoughtful of our choices, and not lose our voice in order to try to live a full, sustainable life.   – IOCDF executive director, Jeff Szymanski, PhD

Seven years ago I was diagnosed with OCD. I finally—finally!—knew what was going on, and that meant I could get help. One of the first lines of defense against…

View original post 1,519 more words